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Solar X-rays from 0.3 a.u.: the ChemiX Bragg Spectrometer on Interhelioprobe

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 September 2016

Janusz Sylwester
Affiliation:
Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Wrocław, Poland email: js@cbk.pan.wroc.pl
Oleksiy Dudnik
Affiliation:
Institute of Radio Astronomy, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkiv, Ukraine email: dudnik@rian.kharkov.ua
Vladimir D. Kuznetsov
Affiliation:
Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radiowave Propagation, RAS, Moscow Troitsk, Russia email: kvd@izmiran.ru
Valery Polansky
Affiliation:
Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radiowave Propagation, RAS, Moscow Troitsk, Russia email: kvd@izmiran.ru
Sergey Kuzin
Affiliation:
Laboratory of X-ray Astronomy of the Sun, P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow, Russia email: kuzin@sci.lebedev.ru
Kenneth J. H. Phillips
Affiliation:
Dept. of Earth Sciences, Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD, U.K. email: kennethjhphillips@yahoo.com
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Abstract

ChemiX is a Bragg crystal spectrometer that will fly on the two Interhelioprobe spacecraft due for launch in 2025 and 2026. The spacecraft perihelion will be only 0.3 a.u. and the orbit inclination up to 30°, and so instruments on board will have a close view of solar active regions and flares and regions near each solar pole. The ChemiX X-ray spectrometer, built by a consortium of groups led by the Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, will fly on each of the spacecraft, and observe X-ray spectra in the 1.5 - 9 Å range. Spectral lines in this range include resonance lines of helium-like and hydrogen-like ions of elements such as Fe, Ca, Ar, S, and Si, with less abundant elements such as K and Cl represented by weaker lines which the high sensitivity of ChemiX should be able to detect. The free–free and free–bound continua should also be detected since instrumental background will be eliminated. Three of the seven channels of ChemiX will be in a “dopplerometer” arrangement by which spatial and spectral shifts present in flare impulsive stages can be disentangled.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2016 

References

Acton, L. W., et al. 1980, Sol. Phys., 65, 53 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Culhane, J. L., et al. 1991, Sol. Phys., 136, 89 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sylwester, J., et al. 2005, Sol. Phys., 226, 45 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sylwester, J., et al. 2015, Sol. Phys., 290, 3683 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Solar X-rays from 0.3 a.u.: the ChemiX Bragg Spectrometer on Interhelioprobe
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