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Possibility to locate the position of the H2O snowline in protoplanetary disks through spectroscopic observations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 January 2020

Shota Notsu
Affiliation:
Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden, The Netherlands JSPS (Japan Society for the Promotion of Science) Overseas Research Fellow email: notsust@strw.leidenuniv.nl
Hideko Nomura
Affiliation:
National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan
Catherine Walsh
Affiliation:
School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK
Mitsuhiko Honda
Affiliation:
Faculty of Biosphere-Geosphere Science, Okayama University of Science, 1-1 Ridai-chou, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-0005, Japan
Tomoya Hirota
Affiliation:
National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan
Eiji Akiyama
Affiliation:
Institute for the Advancement of Higher Education, Hokkaido University, Kita 17, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0817, Japan
Takashi Tsukagoshi
Affiliation:
National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan
Alice S. Booth
Affiliation:
School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK
T. J. Millar
Affiliation:
Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast, University Road, Belfast, BT7 1NN, UK
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Abstract

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Observationally locating the position of the H2O snowline in protoplanetary disks is crucial for understanding planetesimal and planet formation processes, and the origin of water on the Earth. In our studies, we conducted calculations of chemical reactions and water line profiles in protoplanetary disks, and identified that ortho/para-H216O, H218O lines with small Einstein A coefficients and relatively high upper state energies are dominated by emission from the hot midplane region inside the H2O snowline. Therefore, through analyzing their line profiles the position of the H2O snowline can be located. Moreover, because the number density of the H218O is much smaller than that of H216O, the H218O lines can trace deeper into the disk and thus they are potentially better probes of the exact position of the H2O snowline in disk midplane.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
© International Astronomical Union 2020 

References

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