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The Phase-Induced Amplitude Coronagraph (PIAA)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 May 2006

Olivier Guyon
Affiliation:
Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 659 N. A'ohoku Pl., Hilo, HI 96720, USA email: guyon@naoj.org
Eugene A. Pluzhnik
Affiliation:
Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 659 N. A'ohoku Pl., Hilo, HI 96720, USA email: guyon@naoj.org
Stephen T. Ridgway
Affiliation:
National Optical Astronomical Observatories, USA
Robert A. Woodruff
Affiliation:
Lockheed Martin Space Corporation, USA
Celia Blain
Affiliation:
Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 659 N. A'ohoku Pl., Hilo, HI 96720, USA email: guyon@naoj.org
Frantz Martinache
Affiliation:
Cornell University, USA
Raphael Galicher
Affiliation:
Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris, France
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Abstract

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The Phase-Induced Amplitude Coronagraph (PIAAC) uses a lossless beam apodization, performed by aspheric mirrors, to produce a high contrast PSF. Thanks to the lossless apodization, this concept offers a unique combination of high theoretical throughput ($\approx$100%), high angular resolution ($\lambda/d$), small inner working angle (${\approx} 1.5 \lambda/d$), low chromaticity and low sensitivity to pointing errors or angular star diameter. Together, these characteristics make the PRC an ideal choice for direct imaging of extrasolar terrestrial planets (ETPs) from space. We show that a visible telescope smaller than 4m would then achieve the goals of the TPF mission, while other coronagraphs considered for TPF require telescope diameters typically 2 to 3 times larger. On a large size (8m) space telescope, ETPs can be searched for around a significantly larger sample of stars, thus enabling a much higher scientific return.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
© 2006 International Astronomical Union