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Obscured quasars at high redshift in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 July 2014

Ismael Botti
Affiliation:
University of Nottingham, School of Physics & Astronomy, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, U.K. email: ppxib1@nottingham.ac.uk, omar.almaini@nottingham.ac.uk
Omar Almaini
Affiliation:
University of Nottingham, School of Physics & Astronomy, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, U.K. email: ppxib1@nottingham.ac.uk, omar.almaini@nottingham.ac.uk
Will Hartley
Affiliation:
ETH Zurich, Switzerland email: hartleyw@phys.ethz.ch
Alice Mortlock
Affiliation:
Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ, U.K. email: alicem@roe.ac.uk
Paulina Lira
Affiliation:
Depto. de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Camino El Observatorio 1515, Santiago, Chile email: plira@das.uchile.cl
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Abstract

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Obscured quasars hidden in deep X-ray surveys can be recovered by looking at mid-infrared wavelengths, where dust re-radiates the absorbed radiation. Here we present a sample of obscured quasars in the redshift range 1 < z < 4 based on data from the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey (UDS), the deepest near-IR survey over ~ 1 sq. deg. to date. Candidates that are primarily selected by their 24 μm emission are probed by decomposing their spectral energy distribution (SED) to disentangle the emission from the AGN and its host galaxy. We show preliminary results on their host galaxy properties as well as their clustering, showing that obscured quasars are found in galaxies located in the green valley, residing in dark matter haloes not different from normal galaxies at those redshifts.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2014 

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Obscured quasars at high redshift in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey
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