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The Nucleosynthetic Imprint of 15 - 40 M Primordial Supernovae on Metal-Poor Stars

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2010

Daniel J. Whalen
Affiliation:
McWilliams Fellow, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 email: dwhalen@lanl.gov Nuclear and Particle Physics, Astrophysics, and Cosmology (T-2), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545
Candace C. Joggerst
Affiliation:
Nuclear and Particle Physics, Astrophysics, and Cosmology (T-2), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545
Corresponding
E-mail address:
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Abstract

The first stars are key to the formation of primeval galaxies, early cosmological reionization, and the assembly of supermassive black holes. Although Population III stars lie beyond the reach of direct observation, their chemical imprint on long-lived second generation stars may yield indirect measures of their masses. While numerical models of primordial SN nucleosynthetic yields have steadily improved in recent years, they have not accounted for the chemical abundances of ancient metal-poor stars in the Galactic halo. We present new two-dimensional models of 15 - 40 M primordial SNe that capture the effect of progenitor rotation, mass, metallicity, and explosion energy on elemental yields. Rotation dramatically alter the structure of zero-metallicity stars, expanding them to much larger radii. This promotes mixing between elemental shells by the SN shock and fallback onto the central remnant, both of which govern which elements escape the star. We find that a Salpeter IMF average of our yields for Z=0 models with explosion energies of 2.4 × 1051 ergs or less is in good agreement with the abundances measured in extremely metal-poor stars. Because these stars were likely enriched by early SNe from a well-defined IMF, our models indicate that the bulk of the metals in the early universe were synthesized by low-mass primordial stars.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2010

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