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Jet-CO alignments in the environments high-z radio galaxies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 March 2017

Bjorn Emonts*
Affiliation:
Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Ctra de Torrejón a Ajalvir, km 4, 28850 Torrejón de Ardoz, Madrid, Spain
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Abstract

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In the outskirts of massive high-redshift radio galaxies, powerful radio-jets often interact with ambient warm Lyα-emitting gas. We present the discovery of luminous reservoirs of cold molecular gas in these environments, based on CO(1-0) observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The CO-emission is aligned with the radio jets, and found tens of kpc outside the host galaxy. These molecular gas reservoirs have CO luminosities in the range of those found in submm-galaxies (L'CO ~ 4-9 × 1010 K km/s pc2), but they lack any near-infrared counterpart in deep Spitzer imaging. These results suggest that jet-triggered feedback takes place in the circum-galactic environment of high-z radio galaxies. We prefer the interpretation that the CO-emitting gas is formed when the propagating jets enrich, shock and cool pre-existing dusty halo gas. We further argue that sensitive low-surface-brightness CO observations, using radio interferometers in very compact array-configurations, are essential to study the role of the cold molecular medium in the outskirts of massive high-z galaxies.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2017 

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