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The implications of bent jets in galaxy groups

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 March 2015

Danielle M. Nielsen
Affiliation:
Dept. of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI, 53706, USA email: nielsen@astro.wisc.edu
Eric M. Wilcots
Affiliation:
Dept. of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI, 53706, USA email: nielsen@astro.wisc.edu
Corresponding
E-mail address:
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Abstract

Bent-double sources, sometimes referred to as wide- or narrow-angle tails, are most likely the result of ram pressure from either the motion of the source through a dense medium or the "cluster weather." These unusual sources have long been associated with high density, high velocity dispersion, and turbulent environments of massive clusters, however a surprising number have been found in lower mass systems. We focus our attention on a sample of such sources in galaxy groups where the velocity dispersion is significantly lower. We have acquired multi-frequency radio continuum observations using the GMRT of our bent-double sample and new optical spectroscopy to measure the velocity dispersion of groups hosting these bent-double sources. Our goal is to derive an estimate of the density of the intergalactic medium in these groups. Here, we present GMRT data for one source in our sample.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2015 

References

Freeland, E., Cardoso, R. F., & Wilcots, E. 2008, ApJ, 685, 858CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Freeland, E. & Wilcots, E. 2011, ApJ, 738, 145CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Venkatesan, T. C. A.et al., 1994, ApJ, 436, 67CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wing, J. D. & Blanton, E. L. 2011, AJ, 141, 88CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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