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A Herschel and CARMA view of CO and [C ii] in Hickson Compact groups

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 February 2015

Katherine Alatalo
Affiliation:
Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA email: kalatalo@caltech.edu
Philip N. Appleton
Affiliation:
Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA
Ute Lisenfeld
Affiliation:
Departamento de Física Teórica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain
Corresponding
E-mail address:
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Abstract

Understanding the evolution of galaxies from the starforming blue cloud to the quiescent red sequence has been revolutionized by observations taken with Herschel Space Observatory, and the onset of the era of sensitive millimeter interferometers, allowing astronomers to probe both cold dust as well as the cool interstellar medium in a large set of galaxies with unprecedented sensitivity. Recent Herschel observations of of H2-bright Hickson Compact Groups of galaxies (HCGs) has shown that [C ii] may be boosted in diffuse shocked gas. CARMA CO(1–0) observations of these [C ii]-bright HCGs has shown that these turbulent systems also can show suppression of SF. Here we present preliminary results from observations of HCGs with Herschel and CARMA, and their [C ii] and CO(1–0) properties to discuss how shocks influence galaxy transitions and star formation.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2015 

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A Herschel and CARMA view of CO and [C ii] in Hickson Compact groups
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