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Evolution of Massive Galaxy Structural Properties and Sizes via Star Formation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 March 2015

Jamie R. Ownsworth
Affiliation:
University of Nottingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, U.K.
Christopher J. Conselice
Affiliation:
University of Nottingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, U.K.
Alice Mortlock
Affiliation:
University of Nottingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, U.K.
William G. Hartley
Affiliation:
University of Nottingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, U.K.
Fernando Buitrago
Affiliation:
University of Nottingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, U.K. SUPA, Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ, U.K.
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We investigate the resolved star formation properties of a sample of 45 massive galaxies (M* > 1011 M) within a redshift range of 1.5 ⩽ z ⩽ 3 detected in the GOODS NICMOS Survey (Conselice et al. 2011), a HST H160-band imaging program. We derive the star formation rate as a function of radius using rest frame UV data from deep z850 ACS imaging. The star formation present at high redshift is then extrapolated to z = 0, and we examine the stellar mass produced in individual regions within each galaxy. We also construct new stellar mass profiles of the in situ stellar mass at high redshift from Sérsic fits to rest-frame optical, H160-band, data. We combine the two stellar mass profiles to produce an evolved stellar mass profile. We then fit a new Sérsic profile to the evolved profile, from which we examine what effect the resulting stellar mass distribution added via star formation has on the structure and size of each individual galaxy.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2015 

References

Conselice, C. J., Bluck, A. F. L., Buitrago, F., et al. 2011, MNRAS, 413, 80CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ownsworth, J. R., Conselice, C. J., Mortlock, A., et al. 2012, MNRAS, 426, 764CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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