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Carbon and oxygen isotopes in AGB stars. From the cores of AGB stars to presolar dust

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 December 2019

Thomas Lebzelter
Affiliation:
Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Austria email: thomas.lebzelter@univie.ac.at
Kenneth Hinkle
Affiliation:
National Optical Astronomy Observatory950 North Cherry Ave, Tucson, AZ 85719, USA email: khinkle@noao.edu
Oscar Straniero
Affiliation:
INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Teramo, 64100, Teramo, Italy email: oscar.straniero@inaf.it
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Abstract

Isotopic ratios are a powerful tool for gaining insights into stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. The isotopic ratios of the key elements carbon and oxygen are perfectly suited to investigate the pristine composition of red giants, the conditions in their interiors, and the mixing in their extended atmospheres. Of course the dust ejected from red giants in their final evolution also contains isotopically tagged material. This red giant dust is present in the solar system as presolar dust grains. We have measured isotopic ratios of carbon and oxygen in spectra from a large sample of AGB stars including both Miras and semiregular variables. We show how the derived ratios compare with expectations from stellar models and with measurements in presolar grains. Comparison of isotopes that are affected by different types of nucleosynthesis provides insights into galactic evolution.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
© International Astronomical Union 2019 

References

Hinkle, K.H., Lebzelter, T., & Straniero, O. 2016, ApJ, 825, 38 10.3847/0004-637X/825/1/38CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nittler, L.R., Conel, M.O’D.A., Gallino, R., Hoppe, P., Nguyen, A.N., Stadermann, F.J., Zinner, E.K. 2008, ApJ, 682, 1450 10.1086/589430CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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