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ALMA Deep Field in the SSA22 proto-cluster at z = 3

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 June 2020

Hideki Umehata*
Affiliation:
RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198, Japan email: hideki.umehata@riken.jp Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015, Japan
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Abstract

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Galaxies and nuclei in dense environment at high redshift provide a good laboratory to investigate accelerated, most extreme evolution of galaxies. The SSA22 proto-cluster at z = 3.1 is known to have a three-dimensional 50 (comoving) Mpc-scale filamentary structure, traced by Lyα emitters, which makes the field a suitable target in this regard. To identify dust-obscured star-formation, a contiguous 20 arcmin2 region at the node of the cosmic structure was observed in ALMA band 6. In total 57 ALMA sources have been identified above 5σ, which makes the field one of the richest field in ALMA-identified (sub)millimeter galaxies. The follow-up spectroscopy confirmed about 20 sources as exact proto-cluster members so far. Together with high X-ray AGN fraction, our results suggest that the vigorous star formation activity and the growth of super massive black holes occurred simultaneously in the densest regions at z ∼ 3.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
© International Astronomical Union 2020

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ALMA Deep Field in the SSA22 proto-cluster at z = 3
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