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Mass outflow of the X-ray emission line gas in NGC 4151

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 March 2021

S. B. Kraemer
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences, The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064, USA email: kraemer@cua.edu
T. J. Turner
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250 U.S.A
D. M. Crenshaw
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, 25 Park Place, Room 631, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA
H. R. Schmitt
Affiliation:
Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA
M. Revalski
Affiliation:
Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
T. C. Fischer
Affiliation:
Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA

Abstract

We have analyzed Chandra/High Energy Transmission Grating spectra of the X-ray emission line gas in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151. The zeroth-order spectral images show extended H- and He-like O and Ne, up to a distance r ˜ 200 pc from the nucleus. Using the 1st-order spectra, we measure an average line velocity ˜230 km s–1, suggesting significant outflow of X-ray gas. We generated Cloudy photoionization models to fit the 1st-order spectra; the fit required three distinct emission-line components. To estimate the total mass of ionized gas (M) and the mass outflow rates, we applied the model parameters to fit the zeroth-order emission-line profiles of Ne IX and Ne X. We determined an M ≍ 5.4 × 105 Mʘ. Assuming the same kinematic profile as that for the [O III] gas, derived from our analysis of Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph spectra, the peak X-ray mass outflow rate is approximately 1.8 Mʘ yr–1, at r ˜ 150 pc. The total mass and mass outflow rates are similar to those determined using [O III], implying that the X-ray gas is a major outflow component. However, unlike the optical outflows, the X-ray emitting mass outflow rate does not drop off at r > 100pc, which suggests that it may have a greater impact on the host galaxy.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of International Astronomical Union

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Mass outflow of the X-ray emission line gas in NGC 4151
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