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Growth of intermediate mass black holes in first star clusters

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 March 2020

Yuya Sakurai
Affiliation:
School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA30332, US
Naoki Yoshida
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo113-0033, Japan Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), UT Institute for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba277-8583, Japan Research Center for the Early Universe (RESCEU), School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo113-0033, Japan
Michiko S. Fujii
Affiliation:
Department of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo113-0033, Japan email: yuya.sakurai@physics.gatech.edu
Corresponding

Abstract

We study runaway stellar collisions in primordial star clusters and formation of intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs). Using cosmological simulations, we identify eight atomic-cooling halos in which the star clusters form. We follow stellar and dark matter (DM) dynamics for 3Myr using hybrid N-body simulations. We find that the runaway stellar collisions occur in all star clusters and IMBHs with masses ∼400–1900M form. Performing additional N-body simulations, we explore evolutions of the IMBHs in the star clusters for 15 Myr. The IMBH masses grow via stellar tidal disruption events (TDEs) to ∼700–2500 M. The TDE rates are ∼0.3–1.3 Myr−1. DM motions affect the star cluster evolutions and reduce the TDE rates. The IMBHs may subsequently grow to SMBHs by gas supply through galaxy mergers or large-scale gas inflows, or they may remain within or around the clusters.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
© International Astronomical Union 2020

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