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A NOVEL EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN OF A REAL-TIME VR TRACKING DEVICE

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 July 2021

Yazan A M Barhoush*
Affiliation:
University of Oulu, Finland
Vijayakumar Nanjappan
Affiliation:
University of Oulu, Finland
Felix Thiel
Affiliation:
University College London, UK
Georgi V. Georgiev
Affiliation:
University of Oulu, Finland
David Swapp
Affiliation:
University College London, UK
Brian Loudon
Affiliation:
Loud1Design Ltd., Glasgow, UK
*
Barhoush, Yazan A M, University of Oulu, Center for Ubiquitous Computing, Finland, yazan.barhoush@oulu.fi

Abstract

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Virtual Reality (VR) is progressively adopted at different stages of design and product development. Consequently, evolving interaction requirements in engineering design and development for VR are essential for technology adoption. One of these requirements is real-time positional tracking. This paper aims to present an experimental design of a new real-time positional tracking device (tracker), that is more compact than the existing solution, while addressing factors such as wearability and connectivity. We compare the simulation of the proposed device and the existing solution, discuss the results, and the limitations. The new experimental shape of the device is tailored towards research, allowing the engineering designer to take advantage of a new tracker alternative in new ways, and opens the door to new VR applications in research and product development.

Type
Article
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press

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