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DESIGN FOR FUTURE VARIETY TO ENABLE LONG-TERM BENEFITS OF MODULAR PRODUCT FAMILIES

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 July 2021

Erik Greve*
Affiliation:
Institute of Product Development and Mechanical Engineering Design, Hamburg University of Technology;
Christoph Fuchs
Affiliation:
Siemens Advanta
Bahram Hamraz
Affiliation:
Siemens Advanta
Marc Windheim
Affiliation:
Siemens Advanta
Dieter Krause
Affiliation:
Institute of Product Development and Mechanical Engineering Design, Hamburg University of Technology;
*
Greve, Erik, Hamburg University of Technology, Institute of Product Development and Mechanical Engineering Design, Germany, erik.greve@tuhh.de

Abstract

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By developing and using modular product families, large savings can be achieved through reuse and combinability along the entire value chain of a company. Since these potentials often have a very long-term character, the lifetime of a modular product family should be as long as possible. Change drivers, such as changing customer and production requirements, however, result in changes having to be made to the initially developed modular product family, which not only causes a great effort but also prevents the long-term benefits from being fully exploited. With the Change Allocation Model, we introduce a tool that makes it possible to align the essential future changes to the product architecture and to identify and redesign the change-critical components taking into account the existing component variety of the product family. This enables future changes in variety to be considered in the product architecture and a future robust modular product family to be developed. The new visualization is illustrated using the example of a product family of pressure regulating valves and is finally discussed with regard to further potentials and challenges.

Type
Article
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press

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