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Relationship between urinary purine derivative excretion and milk protein yield by dairy cows

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 November 2017

R.J. Dewhurst
Affiliation:
Institute of Grassland and Environmental Research, Plas Gogerddan, Aberystwyth, Dyfed, SY23 3EB Wales
R.T. Evans
Affiliation:
Trawsgoed Research Farm, Trawsgoed, Dyfed, SY23 4LL Wales
V.J. Theobald
Affiliation:
Trawsgoed Research Farm, Trawsgoed, Dyfed, SY23 4LL Wales
M.A. Neville
Affiliation:
Trawsgoed Research Farm, Trawsgoed, Dyfed, SY23 4LL Wales
S. Miles
Affiliation:
Trawsgoed Research Farm, Trawsgoed, Dyfed, SY23 4LL Wales
A.B. McAllan
Affiliation:
Institute of Grassland and Environmental Research, Plas Gogerddan, Aberystwyth, Dyfed, SY23 3EB Wales
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Extract

The ability to predict microbial protein yield in any feeding situation is important in maximising the utilisation of feed nitrogen since it will guide decisions as to whether to take steps to improve rumen function or provide supplementary undegradable protein (UDP). The UK Metabolisable Protein (MP) system (Agricultural and Food Research Council, 1992) predicts the yield of microbial protein from the rumen according to the supply of Fermentable Metabolisable Energy (FME). This has led to an improved understanding of responses seen on farms, though there remains uncertainty about microbial protein yield. The excretion of purine derivatives (PD), allantoin and uric acid, in urine has been used as a non-invasive index of microbial protein flow to the duodenum (Chen et al, 1990) and might form the basis of an on-farm diagnostic test. In earlier work, with spot sampling of urine (Dewhurst et al, 1994), we have shown a relationship between milk protein yield and urinary PD excretion; the current work extended these studies by utilising 6-day total collections of urine.

Type
Techniques & Methods
Copyright
Copyright © The British Society of Animal Science 1995

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References

Agricultural and Food Research Council (1992). Tcorn report no.9. nutrient requirements of ruminant animals: protein. Nutrition Abstracts and Reviews 62B: 787835 Google Scholar
Aston, K., Dewhurst, R.J., Fisher, W.J., Davies, D.W.R. and McAllan, A.B. (1995). Effects of sources of carbohydrate and protein given at low levels with grass silage ad libitum on the performance of lactating dairy cows. Animal Science (in press: this meeting).Google Scholar
Chen, X.B., Hovell, F.D.DeB., Ørskov, E.R. and Brown, D.S. (1990). Excretion of purine derivatives by ruminants: effect of exogenous nucleic acid supply on purine derivative excretion by sheep. British Journal of Nutrition 63: 131142 10.1079/BJN19900098CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dewhurst, R.J., Offer, N.W. and Thomas, C. (1994). Urinary purine derivative excretion and milk protein production by lactating dairy cows. Proceedings of the Society for Nutritional Physiology 3: 236A Google Scholar
Lux, O., Naidoo, D. and Salonikas, C. (1992). Improved hplc method for the simultaneous measurement of allantoin and uric acid in plasma. Annals of Clinical Biochemistry 29: 674675 10.1177/000456329202900611CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

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