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Predicting the performance of populations of growing pigs

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 November 2017

I.J. Wellock*
Affiliation:
Animal Health and Nutrition Department, Scottish Agricultural College, Edinburgh, EH9 3JG, U.K
G.C. Emmans
Affiliation:
Animal Health and Nutrition Department, Scottish Agricultural College, Edinburgh, EH9 3JG, U.K
I. Kyriazakis
Affiliation:
Animal Health and Nutrition Department, Scottish Agricultural College, Edinburgh, EH9 3JG, U.K
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Extract

Models intended to simulate animal performance typically represent a single animal. The assumption necessarily made is that the response of the population will be the same as that of the deterministically simulated response of the ‘average’ individual. However, this will necessarily be the case only if all animals in the population have an equal growth potential, all are at the same stage of growth and all react in the same way to encountered stressors. In order to predict adequately the response of a population in a given environment it is necessary to take account of between animal variation. The objective of this work was to investigate the impact of between-animal variation on the predicted performance of a population of growing pigs.

Type
Theatre Presentations
Copyright
Copyright © The British Society of Animal Science 2004

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References

Wellock, I.J, Emmans, G.C., and Kyriazakis, I.. 2003. Predicting the consequences of social stressors on pig food intake and performance. Journal of Animal Science 81: 29953007.Google Scholar
Drickamer, L.C., Arthur, R.D. and Rosenthal, T.L.. 1999. Predictors of social dominance and aggression in gilts. Applied Animal Behaviour Science 63: 121129.Google Scholar