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Genetic variation of income over feed costs as an individual trait in Holstein cows

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 November 2017

P. Zamani
Affiliation:
Dept. Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Tehran University, Karaj, Iran Dept. Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Bu-Ali University, Hamedan, Iran
S. R. Miraei-Ashtiani
Affiliation:
Dept. Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Tehran University, Karaj, Iran
A. Naserian
Affiliation:
Dept. Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University, Mashhad, Iran
A. Nikkhah
Affiliation:
Dept. Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Tehran University, Karaj, Iran
M. Moradi Shahrebabak
Affiliation:
Dept. Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Tehran University, Karaj, Iran
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Extract

The goal of a breeding programme is to select animals that will be more profitable or efficient than their parents. Two main methods have been developed to allow selection on the breeding objective. The first method is use of selection index that combines individual trait breeding values with economic weights to provide a single measure on which to select animals. The second method measures the breeding objective (e.g. net profit or lifetime profit) directly and provides genetic evaluations for this measure (Visscher and Goddard, 1995). The profitability of a dairy cow is dependent on both outputs (incomes of milk, fat, protein, calving, etc.) and inputs (costs of feed, labour, facilities, etc). Outputs have received considerable attention in breeding objectives for dairy cattle, whilst there has been less consideration of inputs. Feed is a major cost input for dairy producers. Hence, breeding for increasing main gross incomes (milk, fat and protein) and reducing main variable cost (feed) potentially can be of considerable importance. This study was conducted to estimation of genetic variation in income over feed cost (IOFC), as a single trait, and its association with some of other traits in Holstein dairy cows.

Type
Poster Presentations
Copyright
Copyright © The British Society of Animal Science 2005

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References

Graser, H. U., Smith, S. P. and Tier, B. 1987. A derivative-free approach for estimating variance components in animal models by Restricted Maximum Likelihood. Journal of Animal Science 64: 13621370.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Meyer, K. 1997. Programs to estimate variance components by restricted maximum likelihood using a derivative-free algorithm. User notes. Animal genetics and breeding unit, Univ. New England, Armidable, NSW, Australia.Google Scholar
Visscher, P. M., and Goddard, M. E. 1995. Genetic analyses of profit for Australian dairy cattle. Animal Science 61: 918.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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