Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-5k9ck Total loading time: 0.308 Render date: 2022-06-26T23:22:12.405Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

The effect of changing the carbohydrate composition of the concentrate component of the diet of grass silage fed cows on milk yield and composition

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 November 2017

E Smoler
Affiliation:
Centre for Dairy Research [Cedar], Department of Agriculture, The University of Reading, Earley Gate, Reading RG6 2AT
D E Beever
Affiliation:
Centre for Dairy Research [Cedar], Department of Agriculture, The University of Reading, Earley Gate, Reading RG6 2AT
M A Lomax
Affiliation:
Centre for Dairy Research [Cedar], Department of Agriculture, The University of Reading, Earley Gate, Reading RG6 2AT
D J Humphries
Affiliation:
Centre for Dairy Research [Cedar], Department of Agriculture, The University of Reading, Earley Gate, Reading RG6 2AT
G Perrott
Affiliation:
British Sugar plc., Trident Feeds Division, PO Box 11, Oundle Road Peterborough, PE2 9QX
J Waters
Affiliation:
British Sugar plc., Trident Feeds Division, PO Box 11, Oundle Road Peterborough, PE2 9QX
Get access

Extract

With the current production targets and pricing structures prevailing within the UK dairy industry, the incentives for the dairy farmer are to maximise milk protein content whilst controlling the yield of milk and milk fat widiin individual farm quotas. Manipulation of milk fat content by nutritional means is relatively easy, but increasing die protein content of milk by similar means is more difficult and certainly less predictable. Increasing the crude protein content of the diet will invariably stimulate the synthesis of milk protein, but tiiese changes are often associated with a parallel increase in milk volume, such mat milk protein content shows little change. In contrast, several studies have shown mat changing the nature and amount of carbohydrate in the diet can substantially improve milk protein content; Krohn et al., (1985), Roberts & Martindale, (1990), Yan & Roberts (1992, 1993) and Phipps et al (1993). At the same time, the increased use of caustic treated wheat (soda grain) on U.K dairy farms has in part been associated with consistent improvements which have been observed in milk protein content. The primary aim of this study was to consider the effect of replacing part or all of the concentrate portion of grass silage fed cows with alternative carbohydrate rich feeds on me yield of milk and milk constituents. The second objective was to compare the use of soda grain with a 50:50 mixture of rolled wheat and sugarbeet feed on dairy cow performance.

Type
Silage
Copyright
Copyright © The British Society of Animal Science 1995

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

AFRC (1993). Energy and Protein Requirements of Ruminants. CAB International. An advisory manual prepared by AFRC TCORN committee.Google Scholar
Krohn, C.C., Andersen, P.E. and Hvelplund, T. (1985) Stigende maengder roemelasse i fuldfoder til malkekoer. stat. Husdyrbrugs. Medd., No. 568.Google Scholar
Phipps, R.H., Sutton, J.D., & Jones, B.A. (1993). Study of mixed forage diets for dairy cows for Milk Marketing Board of England and Wales. Report No. 9. University of Reading[Cedar].Google Scholar
Roberts, D.J., Martindale, J.F. (1990). Fodder Beet: A review of research findings in relation to animal production. In: Meat and Milk from Forage Crops. (Ed. Pollot, G.E.) pp.137156. British Grassland Society Occasional Symposium No. 24.Google Scholar
Yan, T. & Roberts, D.J.(1992). The responses of lactating cows to feeding of high molasses levels. Animal Production 54: 476 (Abstract).Google Scholar
Yan, T. & Roberts, D.J.(1993). The effect of dietary protein levels on the performance of lactating cows given high levels of molasses. Animal Production 56: 424 (Abstract).Google Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The effect of changing the carbohydrate composition of the concentrate component of the diet of grass silage fed cows on milk yield and composition
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The effect of changing the carbohydrate composition of the concentrate component of the diet of grass silage fed cows on milk yield and composition
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The effect of changing the carbohydrate composition of the concentrate component of the diet of grass silage fed cows on milk yield and composition
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *