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The role of ‘boar-component’ stimuli in courtship and copulatory behaviour in pigs

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 November 2017

P. E. Hughes
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Physiology and Nutrition, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT
P. H. Hemsworth
Affiliation:
Animal Research Institute, Werribee, Victoria 3030, Australia
C. Hansen
Affiliation:
Animal Research Institute, Werribee, Victoria 3030, Australia
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Extract

Courtship behaviour in pigs has been extensively studied in recent years, and it is now clear that boar-originating cues are important in eliciting both proceptive and receptive behaviour in the female. What is less clearly understood is the pattern of development of the ‘boar-component’ stimuli in the young male. There are suggestions in the literature that both olfactory and auditory cues may be sub-optimal or even absent in the early post-pubertal boar, these possibly influencing his stimulatory value and hence mating efficiency. Thus, the present study was designed to evaluate the stimulatory value of young boars and to relate this to their mating performance.

Type
Pigs
Copyright
Copyright © The British Society of Animal Production 1984

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