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Using Rapid Improvement Events for Disaster After-Action Reviews: Experience in a Hospital Information Technology Outage and Response

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 January 2018

Charles M. Little*
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Colorado and the Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, Colorado USA
Christopher McStay
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado USA
Justin Oeth
Affiliation:
University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, Colorado USA
April Koehler
Affiliation:
University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, Colorado USA
Kelly Bookman
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado USA
*
Correspondence: Charles M. Little, DO, Department of Emergency Medicine University of Colorado 12401 E. 17th Ave B215 Aurora, Colorado 80045 USA E-mail: Charles.Little@ucdenver.edu

Abstract

The use of after-action reviews (AARs) following major emergency events, such as a disaster, is common and mandated for hospitals and similar organizations. There is a recurrent challenge of identified problems not being resolved and repeated in subsequent events. A process improvement technique called a rapid improvement event (RIE) was used to conduct an AAR following a complete information technology (IT) outage at a large urban hospital. Using RIE methodology to conduct the AAR allowed for the rapid development and implementation of major process improvements to prepare for future IT downtime events. Thus, process improvement methodology, particularly the RIE, is suited for conducting AARs following disasters and holds promise for improving outcomes in emergency management.

Little CM , McStay C , Oeth J , Koehler A , Bookman K . Using Rapid Improvement Events for Disaster After-Action Reviews: Experience in a Hospital Information Technology Outage and Response. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2018;33(1):98100.

Type
Special Reports
Copyright
© World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine 2018 

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Footnotes

Conflicts of interest: none

References

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