Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-568f69f84b-d8fc5 Total loading time: 0.176 Render date: 2021-09-22T12:54:52.693Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Using a Journal Club Series to Introduce Paramedic Students to Research Fundamentals and Critical Appraisal of Medical Literature

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 July 2019

Lauren M. Maloney*
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New YorkUSA
Robert Trevor Marshall
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New YorkUSA
Paul A. Werfel
Affiliation:
School of Health Technology and Management, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New YorkUSA
Scott E. Johnson
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New YorkUSA
*Corresponding
Correspondence: Lauren Maloney, MD, NRP, FP-C, NCEE Department of Emergency Medicine HSC, Level 4, Room 050 Stony Brook, New York 11794-8530 USA E-mail: lauren.maloney@stonybrookmedicine.edu

Abstract

Introduction:

Despite United States national learning objectives referencing research fundamentals and the critical appraisal of medical literature, many paramedic programs are not meeting these objectives with substantive content.

Problem:

The objective was to develop and implement a journal club educational module for paramedic training programs, which is all-inclusive and could be distributed to Emergency Medical Services (EMS) educators and EMS medical directors to use as a framework to adapt to their program.

Methods:

Four two-hour long journal club sessions were designed. First, the educator provided students with four types of articles on a student-chosen topic and discussed differences in methodology and structures. Next, after a lecture about peer-review, students used search engines to verify references of a trade magazine article. Third, the educator gave a statistics lecture and critiqued the results section of several articles found by students on a topic. Finally, students found an article on a topic of personal interest and presented it to their classmates, as if telling their paramedic partner about it at work. Before and after the series, students from two cohorts (2017, 2018) completed a survey with questions about demographics and perceptions of research. Students from one cohort (2017) received a follow-up survey one year later.

Results:

For the 2016 cohort, 13 students participated and provided qualitative feedback. For the 2017 and 2018 cohorts, 33 students participated. After the series, there was an increased self-reported ability to find, evaluate, and apply medical research articles, as well as overall positive trending opinions of participating in and the importance of prehospital research. This ability was demonstrated by every student during the final journal club session. McNemar’s and Related-Samples Cochran’s Q testing of questionnaire responses suggested a statistically significant improvement in student approval of exceptions from informed consent.

Conclusion:

The framework for this paramedic journal club series could be adapted by EMS educators and medical directors to enable paramedics to search for, critically appraise, and discuss the findings of medical literature.

Type
Brief Report
Copyright
© World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine 2019 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Emergency medical technician paramedic: national standard curriculum (EMT-P). https://one.nhtsa.gov/people/injury/ems/EMT-P/disk_2%5B1%5D/1-1.pdf. Published 1998. Accessed November 12, 2018.Google Scholar
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. National emergency medical services education standards. https://www.ems.gov/pdf/education/National-EMS-Education-Standards-and-Instructional-Guidelines/Paramedic_Instructional_Guidelines.pdf. Published 2009. Accessed November 12, 2018.Google Scholar
Sayre, MR, White, LJ, Brown, LH, McHenry, S. National EMS research agenda. Prehosp Emerg Care. 2002;6(3 Suppl):S143.Google ScholarPubMed
Jones, C, Jones, P. Paramedic research methods: importance and implications. Journal of Paramedic Practice. 2009;1(11):465469.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Myers, JB, Slovis, CM, Eckstein, M, et al. Evidence-based performance measures for Emergency Medical Services systems: a model for expanded EMS benchmarking. Prehosp Emerg Care. 2008;12(2):141151.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sayre, MR, White, LJ, Brown, LH, McHenry, SD. National EMS research agenda: proceedings of the implementation symposium. Acad Emerg Med. 2003;10(10):11001108.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schmidt, TA, Nelson, M, Daya, M, DeIorio, NM, Griffiths, D, Rosteck, P. Emergency medical service providers’ attitudes and experiences regarding enrolling patients in clinical research trials. Prehosp Emerg Care. 2009;13(2):160168.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Brown, LH, Criss, EA, Prasad, NH. An Introduction to EMS Research. 1st ed. Bowie, Maryland USA: Brady/Prentice Hall; 2002.Google Scholar
Griffiths PaGPM. The Paramedic’s Guide to Research: An Introduction. 1st ed. New York, USA: McGraw-Hill/Open University Press; 2012.Google Scholar
Aehlert, B, Vroman, R. Paramedic Practice Today: Above and Beyond. Reprint edition. Burlington, Massachusetts USA: Jones & Bartlett Learning, LLC; 2011.Google Scholar
Hargreaves, K, Goodacre, S, Mortimer, P. Paramedic perceptions of the feasibility and practicalities of prehospital clinical trials: a questionnaire survey. Emerg Med J. 2014;31(6):499504.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Watson, DLB, Sanoff, R, Mackintosh, JE, et al. Evidence from the scene: paramedic perspectives on involvement in out-of-hospital research. Ann Emerg Med. 2012;60(5):641650.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Using a Journal Club Series to Introduce Paramedic Students to Research Fundamentals and Critical Appraisal of Medical Literature
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Using a Journal Club Series to Introduce Paramedic Students to Research Fundamentals and Critical Appraisal of Medical Literature
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Using a Journal Club Series to Introduce Paramedic Students to Research Fundamentals and Critical Appraisal of Medical Literature
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *