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Regional Birth Outcomes after the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami in Miyagi Prefecture

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 March 2018

Junichi Sugawara*
Affiliation:
Division of Feto-Maternal Medical Science. Department of Community Medical Support, Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan
Noriyuki Iwama
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaki Citizen Hospital, Osaki, Japan
Tetsuro Hoshiai
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan
Hideki Tokunaga
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan
Hidekazu Nishigori
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan
Hirohito Metoki
Affiliation:
Division of Public Health, Hygiene and Epidemiology, Tohoku Medical Pharmaceutical University, Sendai, Japan
Kunihiro Okamura
Affiliation:
Tohoku Kohsai Hospital, Sendai, Japan
Nobuo Yaegashi
Affiliation:
Division of Feto-Maternal Medical Science. Department of Community Medical Support, Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan
*
Correspondence: Junichi Sugawara, MD, PhD Division of Feto-Maternal Medical Science Department of Community Medical Support Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan E-mail: jsugawara@med.tohoku.ac.jp

Abstract

Objectives

This study was aimed to analyze post-disaster birth outcomes in coastal and inland regions of Miyagi Prefecture, Japan.

Methods

Primary data sets were compiled from birth records of obstetric facilities and 12,808 patients were analyzed for baseline birth outcomes by region. Regional risk analysis of the low-birth-weight rate and premature birth rate were conducted using multi-level logistic regression analysis.

Results

From overall baseline birth outcomes, a preterm birth rate was 4.6% and low-birth-weight rate was 8.8%. Regional analysis revealed that a preterm birth rate was 3.2% (coastal) and 5.0% (inland), respectively, and the rate of low birth weight was 6.5% in the coastal and 8.5% in the inland region. In the risk analysis of low-birth-weight rate and preterm birth rate, the risk in the coastal region could not be considered any higher than in the inland region (adjusted odds ratio 0.91 [0.73-1.14] and 0.85 [0.46-1.59], respectively).

Conclusions

The incidence of preterm birth and low birth weight were not adversely affected by the disaster. Early transfer and intensive medical intervention may have led to those findings. Further survey will be necessary to determine the long-term effects in both mothers and children.

SugawaraJ, IwamaN, HoshiaiT, TokunagaH, NishigoriH, MetokiH, OkamuraK, YaegashiN. Regional Birth Outcomes after the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami in Miyagi Prefecture. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2018;33(2):215219.

Type
Brief Report
Copyright
© World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine 2018 

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Footnotes

Conflicts of interest: This study was supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research, “Research on Medical Care and Public Health of Pregnant and Postpartum Women in Time of Earthquake Disaster,” from the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare in Japan.

References

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9. Sugawara, J, Hoshiai, T, Sato, K, et al. Impact of the Great East Japan Earthquake on regional obstetrical care in Miyagi Prefecture. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2016;31(3):255-258.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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