Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-ljdsm Total loading time: 0.354 Render date: 2021-08-01T11:52:38.801Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

PsychTable.org

A tool for biopolitical researchers, policymakers, and citizens

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2020

Daniel J Glass
Affiliation:
PsychTable.org, Project Co-leader, Project Co-leader, Cambridge, Massachusetts
Niruban Balachandran
Affiliation:
PsychTable.org, Project Co-leader, Project Co-leader, Cambridge, Massachusetts
Corresponding
E-mail address:
Get access

Abstract

PsychTable.org is a new online, mass-collaborative tool for the social sciences that aggregates evidence for and classifies the evolved psychological adaptations (EPAs) that have been proposed to comprise the human mind. This article provides an overview of the need for this reference tool and how it can benefit researchers who incorporate the behavioral sciences into their work. The article walks the reader through a hypothetical use case for PsychTable.org and describes the features of the website. PsychTable.org is intended to help key stakeholders better understand the linkages between EPAs and political behavior, public policy, and ethics.

Type
Research Tool Report
Copyright
© Association for Politics and the Life Sciences 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Ainsworth, M. D. S., & Bell, S. M. (1970). Attachment, exploration, and separation: Illustrated by the behavior of one-year-olds in a strange situation. Child Development, 41(1), 4967.10.2307/1127388CrossRefGoogle Scholar
American Psychiatric Association. (2013a). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Balachandran, N. (2011). A proposed taxonomy of human evolved psychological adaptations. Journal of Social, Evolutionary, and Cultural Psychology, 5(3), 194207.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Balachandran, N., & Glass, D. J. (2012). PsychTable.org: The taxonomy of human evolved psychological adaptations. Evolution: Education and Outreach, 5(2), 312320.Google Scholar
Barton, J. J., Press, D. Z., Keenan, J. P., & O’Connor, M. (2002). Lesions of the fusiform face area impair perception of facial configuration in prosopagnosia. Neurology, 58(1), 7178.10.1212/WNL.58.1.71CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Brown, T. A., & Barlow, D. H. (2005). Dimensional versus categorical classification of mental disorders in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and beyond: Comment on the special section. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 114(4), 551556.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buss, D. M., Haselton, M. G., Shackelford, T. K., Bleske, A. L., & Wakefield, J. C. (1998). Adaptations, exaptations, and spandrels. American Psychologist, 53(5), 533548.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cosmides, L., Tooby, J., Fiddick, L., & Bryant, G. A. (2005). Detecting cheaters. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 9, 505506.10.1016/j.tics.2005.09.005CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Darwin, C. (1872). The expression of the emotions in man and animals. John Murray.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gould, S. J. (1991). Exaptation: A crucial tool for an evolutionary psychology. Journal of Social Issues, 47(3), 4365.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gould, S. J., & Lewontin, R. C. (1979). The spandrels of San Marco and the Panglossian paradigm: A critique of the adaptationist programme. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 205(1161), 581598.Google Scholar
Gray, T. (2012). Elements: A visual exploration of every known atom in the universe. Black Dog & Leventhal.Google Scholar
Kelly, D. (2011). Yuck! The nature and moral significance of disgust. MIT Press.Google Scholar
Khoury, B., Langer, E. J. and Pagnini, F., (2014). The DSM: Mindful science or mindless power? A critical review. Frontiers in Psychology, 5. doi: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00602Google Scholar
Kurzban, R., & Haselton, M. G. (2006). Making hay out of straw? Real and imagined controversies in evolutionary psychology. In Barkow, J. H. (Ed.), Missing the revolution: Darwinism for social scientists (pp. 149161). Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schmitt, D. P., & Pilcher, J. J. (2004). Evaluating evidence of psychological adaptation: How do we know one when we see one? Psychological Science, 15(10), 643649.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Simpson, J., Carter, S., Anthony, S. H., & Overton, P. G. (2006). Is disgust a homogeneous emotion? Motivation and Emotion, 30(1), 3141.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tybur, J. M., Lieberman, D., Kurzban, R., & DeScioli, P. (2013). Disgust: Evolved function and structure. Psychological Review, 120(1), 6584.10.1037/a0030778CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Welch, S., Klassen, C., Borisova, O., & Clothier, H. (2013). The DSM-5 controversies: How should psychologists respond? Canadian Psychology/psychologie canadienne, 54(3), 166175.Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

PsychTable.org
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

PsychTable.org
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

PsychTable.org
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *