Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-prt4h Total loading time: 0.491 Render date: 2021-10-15T21:12:29.034Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Why a Feminist Theorist Studies Methods

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 September 2009

Brooke Ackerly
Affiliation:
Vanderbilt University

Extract

What are the injustices of the world? What causes them? How might we mitigate them? Feminism needs empirical inquiry in all subfields to inform our understanding of the world and our normative reflections on it. Feminist theorists do not necessarily need to do it ourselves, but we do need it. Because we need empirical research, we need to be able to evaluate its methodology. In international relations, feminist scholars adopt and develop methods previously developed in other fields for nonfeminist questions. Feminist theorists need to evaluate this adoption and development by feminist IR in order to learn all we can and should from feminist IR scholarship.

Type
Critical Perspectives on Gender and Politics
Copyright
Copyright © The Women and Politics Research Section of the American Political Science Association 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Ackerly, Brooke A., Stern, Maria, and True, Jacqui, eds. 2006. Feminist Methodologies for International Relations. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ackerly, Brooke A., and True, Jacqui. 2008. “An Intersectional Analysis of International Relations: Recasting the Discipline.” Politics & Gender 4 (March): 156–73.Google Scholar
Agathangelou, Anna M., and Turcotte, Heather. 2008. Review of Feminist Methodologies for International Relations, ed. Ackerly, Brooke, Stern, Maria, and True, Jacqui, 2006. Politics & Gender 4 (March): 184–87.Google Scholar
Caprioli, Mary. 2000. “Gendered Conflict.” Journal of Peace Research 37 (1): 51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Caprioli, Mary, Hudson, Valerie M., McDermott, Rose, Ballif-Spanvill, Bonnie, Emmett, Chad F., and Matthew Stearmer, S.. 2008. “The WomanStats Project Database: Advancing an Empirical Research Agenda.” On file with the author.Google Scholar
Dhruvarajan, Vanaja, and Vickers, Jill, eds. 2002. Gender, Race, and Nation: A Global Perspective. Toronto and Buffalo: University of Toronto Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kaplan, Caren, Alarcón, Norma, and Moallem, Minoo. 1999. Between Woman and Nation: Nationalisms, Transnational Feminisms, and the State. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
Keohane, Robert O. 1998. “Beyond Dichotomy: Conversations between International Relations and Feminist Theory.” International Studies Quarterly 42 (1): 193–98.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ling, L. H. M. 2002. Postcolonial International Relations: Conquest and Desire between Asia and the West. New York: Palgrave.Google Scholar
Maliniak, Daniel, Oakes, Amy, Petereson, Susan, and Tierney, Michael. 2007. The View from the Ivory Tower: Trip Survey of International Relations Faculty in the United States and Canada. On file with the author.Google Scholar
McClintock, Anne. 1995. Imperial Leather: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in the Colonial Conquest. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
Peterson, V. Spike. 1992. Gendered States: Feminist (Re)Visions of International Relations Theory. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner.Google Scholar
Peterson, V. Spike.. 2003. A Critical Rewriting of Global Political Economy: Integrating Reproductive, Productive, and Virtual Economies. London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tickner, J. Ann. 1997. “You Just Don't Understand: Troubled Engagements between Feminists and IR Theorists.” International Studies Quarterly 41 (4): 611–32.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tickner, J. Ann.. 2001. Gendering World Politics: Issues and Approaches in the Post-Cold War Era. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
True, Jacqui, and Mintrom, Michael. 2001. “Transnational Networks and Policy Diffusion: The Case of Gender Mainstreaming.” International Studies Quarterly 45 (1): 2757.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Why a Feminist Theorist Studies Methods
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Why a Feminist Theorist Studies Methods
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Why a Feminist Theorist Studies Methods
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *