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Tourists in Antarctica: numbers and trends

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 October 2009

Debra J. Enzenbacher
Affiliation:
Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road Cambridge CB2 1ER

Abstract

Approximately 39 000 tourists have visited Antarctica since 1957; numbers peryearare provided. Abrief history of sea and airborne tourism in Antarctica reveals past and current trends. The formation of the International Association of Antarctica Tour Operators and its role in the self-regulated tourism industry in Antarctica are considered, together with the implications of recently-promulgated Antarctic Treaty Recommendation XVI-13. The number of tourists visiting Antarctica is shown to exceed the combined number of scientists and support personnel from all National Antarctic Programs. It is concluded that the ATS provides a suitable framework within which to develop measures to protect Antarctica from tourist activity. However, regulations developed must be based on hard data on the size and impact of the industry to be effectively implemented.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1992

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References

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