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Editor's Column: “Black Men Dressed in Gold”—Eudora Welty, Empty Objects, and the Neobaroque

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 October 2020

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Editorial
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by The Modern Language Association of America

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Editor's Column: “Black Men Dressed in Gold”—Eudora Welty, Empty Objects, and the Neobaroque
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