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The Feel of Not to Feel It

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 October 2020

Extract

At one Minute to Midnight on New Year's EVE 1999, my Wife and I Were Eating Goat Curry on South Andaman island, in the Bay of Bengal. Our motel had set up card tables for buffet diners—Americans, Europeans, and Indians—on a dilapidated tennis court. Nearby stood a large glittering display that read, “Feel 2000 Very Happy New Year.” We had come to India the week before to visit my son, Adam, in the Himalayan village of Dharamsala, home to the Tibetan government in exile. Adam was studying the recent emergence of a Tibetan secular literature, the New Writing that had sprung up in response to Tibet's dual encounter with Maoist China and the exigencies of deracination. He discovered on arrival that, since his last visit, several New Writers had left for places like London and Indianapolis. In serendipitous coincidence with the new millennium, New Writing had just completed its first period of growth and was beginning its diaspora.

Type
The Changing Profession
Information
PMLA , Volume 116 , Issue 5 , October 2001 , pp. 1422 - 1431
Copyright
Copyright © Modern Language Association of America, 2001

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