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Morpho-agronomic traits variability, allelic polymorphism and diversity analysis of African yam bean: towards improving utilization and germplasm conservation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 April 2021

David Adedayo Animasaun
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Ilorin, P. M. B. 1515, Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria
Vincent Ochos Adikwu
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Ilorin, P. M. B. 1515, Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria
Gabriel Ameh Alex
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Ilorin, P. M. B. 1515, Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria
Tomi Philips Akinsunlola
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Ilorin, P. M. B. 1515, Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria
Olabisi Fatimo Adekola
Affiliation:
Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Ilorin, P. M. B. 1515, Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria
Ramar Krishnamurthy
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Ilorin, P. M. B. 1515, Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria C.G. Bhakta Institute of Biotechnology, Uka Tarsadia University, Bardoli, Surat District, Gujarat, India
Corresponding

Abstract

This study assessed the genetic diversity of African yam bean (AYB) accessions using morphological and molecular markers. The accessions were grown, and morphological data collected were subjected to analysis of variance and multivariate analyses. Genomic DNA extracted from the accessions were amplified with inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. The diversity analysis was conducted using MEGA4 software. The accessions varied significantly (P < 0.05) in growth, flowering and seed-related parameters. Flowering commenced early in most accessions. Weight of 100-seed range from 15.01 to 21.15 g with the mean value of 18.30 g. Significant correlations existed between stem height, the number of leaves and leaf dimensions. Also, days to flowering correlated with pod formation; likewise, seed dimension had a positive association with seed weight. The principal biplot revealed that two components accounted for 41.77% of the observed variation. Analysis of the electropherogram showed 95 loci comprising 1351 alleles were detected by the ISSR markers with 65.26% polymorphism and combined polymorphic information content of 0.85. The principal coordinate analysis placed accessions together on a plane based on their spatial relationship. The dendrogram showed accession pairs (TSs-77, TSs-95) and (TSs-111, TSs-84) are closely related. The phylogram identified three kinships with a total length of 454. Accession TSs-115 is likely the progenitor while TSs-82 and TSs-86 are the most recent. The study concluded that a combination of morphological and ISSR markers is effective for the diversity study of AYB and the existing, genetic diversity in the accessions could be harnessed for its improvement, conservation and utilization.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of NIAB

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