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Genetic distinctiveness of safflower cultivars of India and Mexico as revealed by SSR markers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 June 2016

P. Kadirvel
Affiliation:
ICAR-Indian Institute of Oilseeds Research, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad-500030, Telangana, India
D. Ravi
Affiliation:
ICAR-Indian Institute of Oilseeds Research, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad-500030, Telangana, India Institute of Biotechnology, Professor Jayashankar Telangana State Agricultural University, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad-500030, Telangana, India
N. Mukta
Affiliation:
ICAR-Indian Institute of Oilseeds Research, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad-500030, Telangana, India
M.C.L. Montoya-Coronado
Affiliation:
Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias (INIFAP), Campo Experimental Valle del Yaqui, Dr Norman E. Borlaug km 12, C.P. 85000 Cd. Obregón, Sonora, México
S.B. Ghuge
Affiliation:
Vasantrao Naik Marathwada Krishi Vidyapeeth (VNMKV), Parbhani-431402, Maharashtra, India
J. Singh
Affiliation:
Rajmata Vijayaraje Scindia Krishi Vishwa Vidyalaya (RVSKVV), Indore-452001, Madhya Pradesh, India
V. Singh
Affiliation:
Nimbkar Agricultural Research Institute (NARI), Phaltan-415537, Maharashtra, India
S.K. Shinde
Affiliation:
Mahatma Phule Krishi Vidyapeeth (MPKV), Solapur-413001, Maharashtra, India
S.N. Deshmukh
Affiliation:
Dr Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth (Dr PDKV), Akola-444001, Maharashtra, India
P. Yadav
Affiliation:
ICAR-Indian Institute of Oilseeds Research, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad-500030, Telangana, India
K.S. Varaprasad
Affiliation:
ICAR-Indian Institute of Oilseeds Research, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad-500030, Telangana, India
Corresponding

Abstract

Safflower is a traditional oilseed crop in the world. Its seed oil is a healthy edible oil containing high amount of unsaturated fatty acids. Genetically diverse exotic cultivars are valuable germplasm for introducing new diversity in safflower improvement programmes. In this study, we characterized safflower cultivars of India (30) and Mexico (23) comprising varieties, hybrids and advanced lines developed over 50 years for genetic distinctiveness using 38 simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci. Genetic diversity estimates across cultivar groups (total, India and Mexico) were as follows: mean number of alleles (3.2, 3.1, 2.6), expected heterozygosity (0.42, 0.37, 0.37) and polymorphism information content (0.36, 0.33, 0.32) respectively, which suggested narrow SSR allelic diversity within and between cultivar groups. However, distance-based cluster analysis (neighbour-joining tree) and model-based STRUCTURE analysis revealed that safflower cultivars of India and Mexico, with the exception of a few, form two genetically distinct groups. High level of genetic variation explained between the populations (40%) and Fst estimate (0.4) suggested that the cultivar groups were highly differentiated with limited gene flow supporting a strong genetic structuring. High oil (~38%) and high oleic (73–79%) contents of a subset of Mexican safflower varieties and advanced lines were confirmed in field trials in India. These exotic sources from Mexico are valuable for safflower breeding programmes in India to develop new cultivars with high oil yielding potential and high oleic acid content, which is the current market demand.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © NIAB 2016 

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Genetic distinctiveness of safflower cultivars of India and Mexico as revealed by SSR markers
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