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An advanced lentil backcross population developed from a cross between Lens culinaris × L. ervoides for future disease resistance and genomic studies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 April 2021

Tadesse S. Gela
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, 51 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 5A8, Canada
Stanley Adobor
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, 51 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 5A8, Canada
Hamid Khazaei
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, 51 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 5A8, Canada
Albert Vandenberg
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, 51 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 5A8, Canada
Corresponding

Abstract

Genetically accessible variation to some of the abiotic and biotic stresses are limited in the cultivated lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) germplasm. Introgression of novel alleles from its wild relative species will be useful for enhancing the genetic improvement of the crop. L. ervoides, one of the wild relatives of lentil, is a proven source of disease resistance for the crop. Here we introduce a lentil advanced backcross (LABC-01) population developed in cultivar ‘CDC Redberry’ background, based on L. ervoides alleles derived from an interspecific recombinant inbred population, LR-59-81. Two-hundred and seventeen individuals of the LABC-01 population at BC2F3:4 generation were screened for the race 0 of anthracnose (Colletotrichum lentis) and stemphylium blight (Stemphylium botryosum) under controlled conditions. The population showed significant variations for both diseases and the transfer of resistance alleles into the elite cultivar was evident. It also segregated for other traits such as days to flowering, seed coat colour, seed coat pattern and flower colour. Overall, we showed that LABC-01 population can be used in breeding programmes worldwide to improve disease resistance and will be available as a valuable genetic resource for future genetic analysis of desired loci introgressed from L. ervoides.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of NIAB

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An advanced lentil backcross population developed from a cross between Lens culinaris × L. ervoides for future disease resistance and genomic studies
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An advanced lentil backcross population developed from a cross between Lens culinaris × L. ervoides for future disease resistance and genomic studies
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