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Article contents

Intonational structure in Japanese and English

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 October 2008

Mary E. Beckman
Affiliation:
Ohio State University & AT &T Bell Laboratories
Janet B. Pierrehumbert
Affiliation:
AT&T Bell Laboratories

Extract

Comparisons between Japanese and English prosodics have usually either focused on the strikingly apparent phonetic differences between the stress patterns of English and the tonal accent patterns of Japanese or concentrated upon formal similarities between the abstract arrangements of the stresses and tones. A recent investigation of tone structure in Japanese (Pierrehumbert & Beckman forthcoming), however, has convinced us that if the proper prosodic phenomena are compared, far more pervasive similarities can be discovered and of a much more concrete sort than hitherto suspected. In particular, there is now extensive evidence that Japanese tonal patterns are very sparsely specified, which suggests that they are much more similar to English intonational structures than earlier descriptions would have allowed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1986

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