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Article contents

Strategies for the use of anthelmintics in livestock and their implications for the development of drug resistance

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 April 2009

J. F. Michel
Affiliation:
Central Veterinary Laboratory, Weybridge

Extract

Just as human helminth infections are vitally influenced by the way in which people live, so the helminthiases of domestic animals depend on how these are managed.Veterinary helminthology is a branch of agriculture. The agricultural industry changes quickly, more quickly than the ideas of scientists. Ideas, in their turn change more rapidly than their practical implications are understood. A discussion of anthelmintic use must therefore be partly agricultural, partly historical.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1985

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References

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