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Article contents

The role of metalloproteases in Leishmania species infection in the New World: a systematic review

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 March 2018

Letícia Sayuri Murase
Affiliation:
Graduation in Biomedicine, Department of Clinical Analysis and Biomedicine, State University of Maringá, Maringá, PR, Brazil
João Vítor Perez de Souza
Affiliation:
Graduation in Biomedicine, Department of Clinical Analysis and Biomedicine, State University of Maringá, Maringá, PR, Brazil
Quirino Alves de Lima Neto
Affiliation:
Department of Biochemistry, State University of Maringá, PR, Brazil
Tatiane França Perles de Mello
Affiliation:
Biosciences and Physiopathology by the Graduate Program of the State University of Maringá, Maringá, PR, Brazil
Bruna Muller Cardoso
Affiliation:
Biosciences and Physiopathology by the Graduate Program of the State University of Maringá, Maringá, PR, Brazil
Daniele Stéfanie Sara Lopes Lera-Nonose
Affiliation:
Postgraduate in Health Sciences of the State University of Maringá, Maringá, PR, Brazil
Jorge Juarez Vieira Teixeira
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Analysis and Biomedicine, State University of Maringá, Maringá, PR, Brazil
Maria Valdrinez Campana Lonardoni
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Analysis and Biomedicine, State University of Maringá, Maringá, PR, Brazil
Izabel Galhardo Demarchi
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Analysis and Biomedicine, State University of Maringá, Maringá, PR, Brazil
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

This is a systematic review on the role of metalloproteases in the pathogenicity of the American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) caused by New World Leishmania species. The review followed the PRISMA method, searching for articles in PubMed, EMBASE, LILACS and ISI Web of Science, by employing the following terms: ‘leishmaniasis’, ‘cutaneous leishmaniasis’, ‘mucocutaneous leishmaniasis’, ‘diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis’, ‘Leishmania’ and ‘metalloproteases’. GP63 of New World Leishmania species is a parasite metalloproteases involved in the degradation and cleavage of many biological molecules as kappa-B nuclear factor, fibronectin, tyrosine phosphatases. GP63 is capable of inhibiting the activity of the complement system and reduces the host's immune functions, allowing the survival of the parasite and its dissemination. High serological/tissue levels of host matrix metalloproteases (MMP)-9 have been associated with tissue damage during the infection, while high transcriptional levels of MMP-2 related with a satisfactory response to treatment. Host MMPs serological and tissue levels have been investigated using Western Blot, zymography, and Real Time polymerase chain reaction. GP63 detection characterizes species and virulence in promastigotes isolated from lesions samples using techniques mentioned previously. The monitoring of host MMPs levels and GP63 in Leishmania isolated from host samples could be used on the laboratory routine to predict the prognostic and treatment efficacy of ATL.

Type
Review Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2018 

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