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Article contents

The problem of drug resistance in malaria

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 April 2009

W. Peters
Affiliation:
Department of Medical Protozoology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT

Extract

The resistance in human malaria is mainly of practical importance in relation to Plasmodium falciparum. Strains resistant not only to chloroquine but also to dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors, and even to potentiating combinations of these with sulphonamides or sulphones, are appearing in an ever increasing geographical area which now includes tropical Africa and India. Few new drugs are available or foreseen for the near future, mefloquine and artemisinine being the leading contenders. It is vital that all measures possible should be taken to protect such new compounds, their deployment in the form of judiciously selected combinations with other antimalarials being an essential procedure that should be followed. Drugs in new chemical classes and with different modes of action are still urgently needed. Reliance should not be placed on drugs alone to control malaria on a community basis.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1985

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