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The mitochondrial genome of Angiostrongylus mackerrasae is distinct from A. cantonensis and A. malaysiensis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 February 2020

Hayley Valentyne
Affiliation:
Sydney School of Veterinary Science, Faculty of Science, University of Sydney, 2006, New South Wales, Australia
David M. Spratt
Affiliation:
Australian National Wildlife Collection, National Research Collections Australia, CSIRO, GPO Box 1700, Canberra, 2601, Australia Capital Territory, Australia
Mahdis Aghazadeh
Affiliation:
Sydney School of Veterinary Science, Faculty of Science, University of Sydney, 2006, New South Wales, Australia School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, 4343, Queensland, Australia
Malcolm K. Jones
Affiliation:
School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, 4343, Queensland, Australia
Jan Šlapeta*
Affiliation:
Sydney School of Veterinary Science, Faculty of Science, University of Sydney, 2006, New South Wales, Australia
*
Author for correspondence: Jan Šlapeta, E-mail: jan.slapeta@sydney.edu.au

Abstract

The native rat lungworm (Angiostrongylus mackerrasae) and the invasive rat lungworm (Angiostrongylus cantonensis) occur in eastern Australia. The species identity of A. mackerrasae remained unquestioned until relatively recently, when compilation of mtDNA data indicated that A. mackerrasae sensu Aghazadeh et al. (2015b) clusters within A. cantonensis based on their mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA). To re-evaluate the species identity of A. mackerrasae, we sought material that would be morphologically conspecific with A. mackerrasae. We combined morphological and molecular approaches to confirm or refute the specific status of A. mackerrasae. Nematodes conspecific with A. mackerrasae from Rattus fuscipes and Rattus rattus were collected in Queensland, Australia. Morphologically identified A. mackerrasae voucher specimens were characterized using amplification of cox1 followed by the generation of reference complete mtDNA. The morphologically distinct A. cantonensis, A. mackerrasae and A. malaysiensis are genetically distinguishable forming a monophyletic mtDNA lineage. We conclude that A. mackerrasae sensu Aghazadeh et al. (2015b) is a misidentified specimen of A. cantonensis. The availability of the mtDNA genome of A. mackerrasae enables its unequivocal genetic identification and differentiation from other Angiostrongylus species.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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The mitochondrial genome of Angiostrongylus mackerrasae is distinct from A. cantonensis and A. malaysiensis
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