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Description of Joyeuxiella pasqualei (Cestoda: Dipylidiidae) from an Italian domestic dog, with a call for further research on its first intermediate host

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 September 2022

Marcos Antonio Bezerra-Santos
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari, Valenzano, Italy
Jairo Alfonso Mendoza-Roldan
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari, Valenzano, Italy
Riccardo Paolo Lia
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari, Valenzano, Italy
Giada Annoscia
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari, Valenzano, Italy
Rolf Schuster
Affiliation:
Department of Parasitology, Central Veterinary Research Laboratory, Dubai
Antonio Varcasia
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy
Giovanni Sgroi
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari, Valenzano, Italy
David Modry
Affiliation:
Biology Centre, Institute of Parasitology, Czech Academy of Sciences, České Budějovice, Czech Republic Department of Botany and Zoology, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic Department of Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources, Czech University of Life Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic
Domenico Otranto*
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari, Valenzano, Italy Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan, Iran
*
Author for correspondence: Domenico Otranto, E-mail: domenico.otranto@uniba.it

Abstract

Although Joyeuxiella pasqualei is frequently detected in cats from Mediterranean Europe, information on its biology is still scarce. This cestode is relatively less frequently reported in dogs, possibly because it is often misdiagnosed with the better-known Dipylidium caninum. The occurrence of J. pasqualei proglottids in a dog living in a closed environment triggered us to delve into the biology of this cestode by collecting biological samples from lizards and a road-killed cat. Two reptile species, Podarcis siculus (Lacertidae), and Tarentola mauritanica (Geckonidae) were also collected in the garden and its surroundings. In addition, experimental infections with eggs obtained from gravid proglottids were performed in laboratory mice, and Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) beetles. Proglottids from the dog's feces and adult cestodes detected at necroscopy of a cat were morphologically identified as J. pasqualei. Two out of 13 T. mauritanica collected in the garden had natural infections of J. pasqualei cysts in the liver and attached to the intestine. All P. siculus lizards and experimentally infected rodents and beetles were negative. DNA sequences obtained from J. pasqualei showed the highest nucleotide similarities with Versteria sp., Echinococcus sp., Raillietina sonini, Taenia polyacantha and D. caninum. Data herein provided show the inability of rodents to become infected by direct ingestion of gravid proglottids, suggesting a need for an invertebrate first intermediate host in the life cycle. Thus, more research study is advocated to better understand the biology of J. pasqualei such as its first intermediate host and its mechanism of transmission in reptiles and rodents.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press

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