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Article contents

Crowding effect on adult growth, pre-patent period and egg shedding of Fasciola hepatica

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 July 2006

M. A. VALERO
Affiliation:
Departamento de Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andrés Estellés s/n, 46100 Burjassot – Valencia, Spain
M. DE RENZI
Affiliation:
Instituto Cavanilles de Biodiversidad y Biología Evolutiva, Universidad de Valencia, Apartado Postal 22085, 46071 Paterna-Valencia, Spain
M. PANOVA
Affiliation:
Departamento de Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andrés Estellés s/n, 46100 Burjassot – Valencia, Spain
M. A. GARCIA-BODELON
Affiliation:
Departamento de Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andrés Estellés s/n, 46100 Burjassot – Valencia, Spain
M. V. PERIAGO
Affiliation:
Departamento de Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andrés Estellés s/n, 46100 Burjassot – Valencia, Spain
D. ORDOÑEZ
Affiliation:
Departamento de Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andrés Estellés s/n, 46100 Burjassot – Valencia, Spain
S. MAS-COMA
Affiliation:
Departamento de Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andrés Estellés s/n, 46100 Burjassot – Valencia, Spain

Abstract

Fascioliasis pathogenesis depends on fluke burden. In human hyperendemic zones, individual infection intensities reach very high levels and the majority of infected subjects should be in the advanced chronic phase. The rat model offers a useful approach for pathological research in the advanced chronic period. The influence of infection intensity per rat on fluke development, pre-patent period and egg shedding (eggs/g faeces/worm) was analysed in 3 groups (I: 1–3 worms/rat; II: 4–6; III: 7–9). Ontogenetic trajectories of fluke body measures followed a logistic model. Results showed that when the burden increases, the maximum values of fluke measures decrease. The crowding effect is manifest when fluke measures approximate their maximums in the advanced chronic stage. The pre-patent period and egg production decrease when the burden increases. This means that measurements of eggs per gramme of faeces tend to underestimate the fluke burden. The present study demonstrates how to quantify the fascioliasis experimental rat model crowding effect on adult growth, pre-patent period and egg production. This quantification may be of great interest in epidemiological studies and in experimental research on the in vivo actions of different anthelminthic drugs and vaccines, pathology, immunology and resistance studies.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2006 Cambridge University Press

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