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Aqueous aluminium eliminates Gyrodactylus salaris (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea) infections in Atlantic salmon

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 July 1999

A. SOLENG
Affiliation:
Zoological Museum, University of Oslo, Sars gate 1, N-0562 Oslo, Norway
A. B. S. POLÉO
Affiliation:
Department of Biology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1066, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway
N. E. W. ALSTAD
Affiliation:
Department of Biology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1066, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway
T. A. BAKKE
Affiliation:
Zoological Museum, University of Oslo, Sars gate 1, N-0562 Oslo, Norway

Abstract

This study focuses on the effect of acidic water and aqueous aluminium on the monogenean ectoparasite Gyrodactylus salaris, infecting Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) parr. G. salaris-infected salmon were exposed to various combinations of acidity and aluminium concentrations. The most pronounced effect was the elimination of parasites after 4 days when 202 μg Al/l was added to the water. The effect of aluminium was concentration dependent, but was relatively independent of pH (5·2, 5·6 and 5·9). At the lowest pH of 5·0 the effect of aluminium was enhanced. Acidic aluminium-poor water had no or minor effects on the G. salaris infections except at pH 5·0 where all parasites were eliminated within 9 days. The G. salaris populations increased exponentially in untreated control water. The results show for the first time that aqueous aluminium can, to a limited extent, have a positive effect on fish health. This study emphasizes that basic knowledge about abiotic environmental factors is of importance in order to understand the population dynamics, range extension and dispersal of ectoparasites such as G. salaris. Finally, our results suggest that aluminium treatment could form an effective disinfection method against ectoparasites in hatcheries and laboratories, as well as complementing the controversial rotenone treatments used against natural populations of G. salaris.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
1999 Cambridge University Press

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Aqueous aluminium eliminates Gyrodactylus salaris (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea) infections in Atlantic salmon
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