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Willingness to use hospice care among caregivers of Latino patients in the United States–Mexico border region

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 September 2016

Eunjeong Ko*
Affiliation:
School of Social Work, San Diego State University, San Diego, California
Jaehoon Lee
Affiliation:
College of Education, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas
Carlos Ramirez
Affiliation:
AccentCare Home Health, El Centro, California
Stephanie Martinez
Affiliation:
Imperial Child Protective Services, El Centro, California
Denicka Lopez
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, California
*
Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Eunjeong Ko, School of Social Work, San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, California 92182-4119. E-mail: eko@mail.sdsu.edu.

Abstract

Objective:

Hospice is an important method of promoting quality end-of-life (EoL) care, yet its utilization is relatively low in underserved populations. The unique characteristics of a border community—such as a lack of healthcare resources and cultural integration—impact EoL decision making. The aim of our study was to assess the willingness to use hospice care services and its predictors among family caregivers of Latino patients in the United States (U.S.)–Mexico border region of Southern California.

Method:

This study analyzes secondary data from a home health agency in the U.S.–Mexico border region. Quantitative data were collected via a face-to-face interview with 189 caregivers of patients enrolled in the agency. Bivariate tests and logistic regression were employed to address our study objectives.

Results:

The majority (83%) of family caregivers were willing to use hospice services for their loved ones. The factors impacting willingness to use hospice services included the primary language of the caregiver (OR = 6.30, CI 95% = 1.68, 23.58); trust in doctors to make the right decisions (OR = 3.77, CI 95% = 1.05, 13.57); and the belief that using hospice care means giving up on life (OR = 0.52, CI 95% = 0.30; 0.88). Caregivers who trusted doctors to make the best decisions for their loved ones and English-speaking caregivers were more willing to utilize hospice services, while caregivers who held a strong belief that hospice care means giving up on life were less likely to consider using hospice care for their loved ones.

Significance of results:

The willingness of family caregivers to use hospice services for their loved ones is influenced by cultural perspectives about hospice care. As the importance of family involvement in EoL care planning has been highlighted, family caregivers' beliefs about hospice care services need to be addressed within their particular cultural context.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 

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