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The giant river otter in El Tuparro National Park, Colombia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 April 2009

Thomas R. Defler
Affiliation:
Apartado Aéreo 4559, Bogotá, Colombia.
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Abstract

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Giant river otters were once widespread in the rivers and creeks of the greater Amazon Basin. Hunting for their skins caused many local extinctions and only small scattered populations now remain, although total numbers are unknown. It is seriously endangered in Colombia, and one of the places where it still occurs in any numbers, El Tuparro National Park, is becoming increasingly accessible to people, while the otter populations in adjacent rivers outside the park are even more vulnerable to poaching.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Fauna and Flora International 1986

References

Defler, T.R. 1983a. Colombia's El Tuparro National Park. Oryx, 17, 1517.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Defler, T.R. 1983b. Associations of giant river otter (Pteronura brasiliensis) and fresh-water dolphin (Inia geoffrensis). J. Mamm. 64, 692.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Duplaix, N. 1980. Observations on the ecology and behaviour of the giant river otter Pteronura brasiliensis in Suriname. Rev. Ecol. (Terre Vie), 34, 495620.Google Scholar
Thornback, J. and Jenkins, M. 1982. The IUCN Mammal Red Data Book, Part I, pp. 365368. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland.Google Scholar
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