Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-747cfc64b6-dkhcg Total loading time: 0.228 Render date: 2021-06-15T17:16:57.612Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Article contents

Abundance, distribution and conservation significance of regionally endemic plant species on Anegada, British Virgin Islands

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 August 2004

Colin Clubbe
Affiliation:
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, TW9 3AB, UK
Michael Gillman
Affiliation:
Department of Biological Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA, UK
Pedro Acevedo-Rodríguez
Affiliation:
Department of Botany, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC 20560-0166, USA
Raymond Walker
Affiliation:
British Virgin Islands National Parks Trust, PO Box 860, Road Town, Tortola, British Virgin Islands
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

The conservation significance of the Caribbean island of Anegada in the British Virgin Islands is highlighted in this study of the distribution of plant species in two major habitats, sand dunes and limestone pavement. In 104 plots along 27 transects located around the western salt ponds of the Anegada Ramsar site, 133 plant species were recorded, including five regional endemics. The limestone pavement supported large populations of Acacia anegadensis, endemic to Anegada, and Cordia rupicola, known only from Anegada and Puerto Rico (although the Puerto Rican population is thought to be extirpated). The sand dunes supported a large population of Metastelma anegadense, also endemic to Anegada. Two other regional endemics were recorded within the limestone cays, Leptocereus quadricostatus, previously known from only one locality in Puerto Rico and Malpighia woodburyana, restricted to a few small populations on islands on the Puerto Rican Bank. For both of these species Anegada supports the largest known individual population.

Type
Short Communication
Copyright
2004 Fauna & Flora International
You have Access
7
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Abundance, distribution and conservation significance of regionally endemic plant species on Anegada, British Virgin Islands
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Abundance, distribution and conservation significance of regionally endemic plant species on Anegada, British Virgin Islands
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Abundance, distribution and conservation significance of regionally endemic plant species on Anegada, British Virgin Islands
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *