Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-78bd46657c-2z7pd Total loading time: 0.169 Render date: 2021-05-09T01:46:01.589Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Article contents

Hyphal growth and colony expansion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2000

A. H. C. van Bruggen
Affiliation:
Biological Farming Systems Group, Wageningen University, Marijkeweg 22, 6709 PG Wageningen, The Netherlands
A. J. Termorshuizen
Affiliation:
Biological Farming Systems Group, Wageningen University, Marijkeweg 22, 6709 PG Wageningen, The Netherlands
A. M. Semenov
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology, Moscow State University, 119899 Moscow, Russia
Get access

Abstract

Several generations of soil microbiologists and plant pathologists have attempted to unravel the microbial composition, population dynamics and various life-sustaining processes in the soil. However, until recently, this basic resource for plant growth and nutrient recycling has to a large extent remained a black box. Studies have been made of the behavior of individual microorganisms or their population dynamics, but the relationship between the growth of individual organisms or parts of organisms (such as fungal hyphae) and that of populations and communities has been largely unknown. In particular, the spread of fungal colonies in soil has been an enigma, but now Bailey et al. (pp. 000–000 in this issue) have clearly demonstrated that spatial behavior of Rhizoctonia colonies can switch from finite to invasive expansion dependent on the non-linear relationship between the distance among substrate particles and the probability of colonization.

Type
FORUM Commentary
Copyright
© Trustees of the New Phytologist 2000

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Hyphal growth and colony expansion
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Hyphal growth and colony expansion
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Hyphal growth and colony expansion
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *