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The growth response of some Chytridiomycota to temperatures commonly observed in the soil

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 June 2005

Frank H. GLEASON
Affiliation:
School of Biological Sciences A12, University of Sydney, 2006 Australia. E-mail: frankjanet@ozemail.com.au
Peter M. LETCHER
Affiliation:
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, USA.
Zoe COMMANDEUR
Affiliation:
School of Biological Sciences A12, University of Sydney, 2006 Australia. E-mail: frankjanet@ozemail.com.au
Cho Eun JEONG
Affiliation:
School of Biological Sciences A12, University of Sydney, 2006 Australia. E-mail: frankjanet@ozemail.com.au
Peter A. McGEE
Affiliation:
School of Biological Sciences A12, University of Sydney, 2006 Australia. E-mail: frankjanet@ozemail.com.au
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Abstract

Chytridiomycota were isolated into pure culture from cool temperate and warm semi-arid soils of eastern Australia. In pure culture these fungi responded variably to the range of temperatures commonly recorded in their environment. All members of the Blastocladiales, Spizellomycetales and Chytridiales grew in culture at temperatures up to 30 °C. Some isolates from the Blastocladiales and Spizellomycetales continued to grow at or above 37 °. Some isolates of the Chytridiales grew up to but not beyond 35 °. All isolates in the Chytridiales were able to resume growth at 20 ° after brief exposure to temperatures higher than the maximum growth temperature, but were killed by exposure to higher temperatures for 7 d. Because in the natural soil habitat temperature may exceed the maximum for growth it may be a limiting factor that determines the distribution of chytrids in the soil.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© The British Mycological Society 2005

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