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When Organometallic Chemistry and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Meet Optimized Silicon-based Gas Sensor

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Pamela Yoboue
Affiliation:
pyoboue@laas.fr, LAAS CNRS, Toulouse, France
Philippe Menini
Affiliation:
menini@laas.fr, LAAS CNRS, Toulouse, France
Andre Maisonnat
Affiliation:
maisonat@lcc-toulouse.fr, LCC CNRS, Toulouse, France
Myrtil Kahn
Affiliation:
kahn@lcc-toulouse.fr, LCC CNRS, Toulouse, France
Katia Fajerwerg
Affiliation:
fajerwerg@lcc-toulouse.fr, LCC CNRS, Toulouse, France
Bruno Chaudret
Affiliation:
chaudret@lcc-toulouse.fr, LCC CNRS, Toulouse, France
Pierre Fau
Affiliation:
fau@lcc-toulouse.fr, LCC CNRS, Toulouse, France
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Abstract

A robust silicon gas sensor chip (platinum heater, low deformation membrane) has been designed and successfully operated with various metal oxide nanoparticles synthesized by an organometallic route (SnO2, ZnO) and deposited by a generic ink-jet method. High quality and micron thick layers are obtained and the CO gas sensitivity is presented.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2010

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References

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