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Wavelength Selective Emitting Materials Using High-Temperature Photonic Structures

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Yong Sung Kim
Affiliation:
kimy10@rpi.edu, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Troy, New York, United States
Shawn-Yu Lin
Affiliation:
sylin@rpi.edu, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Troy, New York, United States
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Abstract

Recently, wavelength selective emitting materials have attracted extensive interest due to their potential of high optical-to-electricity conversion efficiency for thermal photovoltaic (TPV) cells and realizing high efficient incandescent light sources. A substantial increase in spectral control over thermal radiation and photon recycling can accomplish this objective by the development of high-temperature photonic structures (HTPS) that simultaneously suppress unwanted radiation and enhance emission in a desirable wavelength range. In this paper, we shall review the properties of HTPS as a wavelength selective emitter, the radiative energy transfer relation in real devices, and photon recycling scheme using wavelength selective filters.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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References

1 Harder, Nils-Peter and Wurfel, Peter, “Theoretical limits of thermophotovoltaic solar energy conversion”, Semicond. Sci. Technol. 18, S151–S157 (2003).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2 Lin, S.Y.. Fleming, J.G., El-Kady, I., “Experimental observation of photonic-crystal emission near a photonic band-edgeAppl. Phys. Lett., 83, 593 (2003).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3 Lin, S.Y., Fleming, J.G., El-Kady, I., “Highly Efficient Light Emission at ë=1.5 μm from a 3D Tungsten Photonic Crystal”, Optics. Lett. 28, 1683 (2003).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4 Lin, S. Y., Ye, D.-X., Lu, T.-M., Bur, J., Kim, Y. S., and Ho, K. M., “Achieving a photonic band edge near visible wavelengths by metallic coatings,” J. Appl. Phys., 99, 083104 (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5 Kim, Y. S., Lin, S. Y., Chang, A., Lee, J. H., and Ho, K. M., “Analysis of photon recycling using metallic photonic crystal”, J. Appl. Phys. 102, 063107 (2007).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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