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UV Laser-Initiated Formation of Si3N4 *

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

T. F. Deutsch
Affiliation:
Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lexington, Massachusetts 02173
D. J. Silversmith
Affiliation:
Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lexington, Massachusetts 02173
R. W. Mountain
Affiliation:
Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lexington, Massachusetts 02173
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Abstract

Si3N4 films have been deposited on Si by using 193 nm ArF excimer laser radiation to initiate the reaction of SiH4 and NH3 at substrate temperatures between 200–600°C. Stoichiometric films having physical and optical properties comparable to those produced using low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) have been produced. The dielectric properties of the films are at present inferior to those of LPCVD material.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1983

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Footnotes

*

This work was sponsored by the Department of the Air Force, in part under a specific program sponsored by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and by the Army Research Office.

References

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