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Use of Focused Ion Beam Milling for Patterned Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Ying Chen
Affiliation:
ying.chen@anu.edu.au, The Australian National University, Electronic Materials Engineering, Mills Road, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia, 61 2 6125 8338
Ying Chen
Affiliation:
ying.chen@anu.edu.au, The Australian National University, Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Mills Road, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
Hua Chen
Affiliation:
hua.chen@anu.edu.au, The Australian National University, Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Mills Road, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
James S Williams
Affiliation:
jsw109@rsphysse.anu.edu.au, The Australian National University, Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Mills Road, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
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Abstract

A new template technique has been developed to help patterned growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on Si surface without predeposition of metal catalysts. Focused ion beam (FIB) milling was used to create trenches on Si wafer surface as the template and carbon nanotubes only nucleated and grew inside the trenches during a controlled pyrolysis of iron phthalocyanine at 1000oC. The selective growth in the trenches is due to its special surface morphology, crystalline structure and capillarity effect.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2008

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References

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Use of Focused Ion Beam Milling for Patterned Growth of Carbon Nanotubes
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