Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-888d5979f-g6cgc Total loading time: 0.291 Render date: 2021-10-28T09:37:46.408Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Ultrastructure of the Mineralized Tissue/Calcium Phosphate Interface in Vitro

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

Joost D. de Bruijn
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Otobiology and Biocompatibility, Biomaterials Research Group, University of Leiden, Rijnsburgerweg 10, 2333 AA Leiden, The Netherlands.
John E. Davies
Affiliation:
Centre for Biomaterials, University of Toronto, 170 College Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 1A1, Canada.
Jim S. Flach
Affiliation:
Centre for Biomaterials, University of Toronto, 170 College Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 1A1, Canada.
Klaas de Groot
Affiliation:
Centre for Biomaterials, University of Toronto, 170 College Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 1A1, Canada.
Clemens A. van Blitterswijk
Affiliation:
Centre for Biomaterials, University of Toronto, 170 College Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 1A1, Canada.
Get access

Abstract

An in vitro rat bone marrow cell (RBMC) system was used to examine the structure of the interface established between calcium phosphates (Ca-P) and mineralized tissue. The Ca-P used, varied either in chemical structure or crystallinity. Therefore, not only the influence of chemical composition, but also the effect of degradation of Ca-P ceramics could be studied. The interfaces were examined with scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM).

SEM showed that deposition of mineralized extracellular matrix on the different materials examined varied both in time and morphology. Mineralization started with the formation of afibrillar globules with which collagen fibres became integrated. With TEM, three distinctly different interfacial structural arrangements were observed which were dependent on the presence or absence of an electron dense layer and/or an amorphous zone. The former was considered to be at least partially caused by protein adsorption, which would precede biological mineralization events, whereas the latter was considered to represent partial degradation of the ceramic surfaces.

The results of this study showed that interfacial reactions were not only influenced by the chemical structure, but also by the crystallinity of Ca-P ceramics. Thus, characterisation of Ca-P implant materials is of critical importance in achieving a better understanding of the phenomena that occur at the bone-biomaterial interface.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1992

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Jarcho, M., Clin. Orthop. Rel. Res., 157, 1981, 259278.Google Scholar
2. Ganeles, J., Listgarten, M.A. and Evian, C.I., J. Periodontol. 57, 1985, 133139.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. van Blitterswijk, C.A., Grote, J.J., Kuijpers, W., Blok-van Hock, C.J.G. and Daems, W.Th., Biomaterials, 6, 1985, 243251.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. LeGeros, R.Z., Adv. Dent. Res. 2, 1988, 164180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Klein, C.P.A.T., Patka, P., Lubbe, H.B.B. van der, Wolke, J.G.C. and Groot, K. de, J. Biomed. Mater. Res., 25, 1991, 5365.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Denissen, H.W., Groot, K. de, Makkes, P.Ch., Hooff, A. van den and Klopper, P.J., J. Biomed. Mater. Res., 14, 1980, 713721.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Blitterswijk, C.A. van, Grote, J.J., Koerten, H.K. and Kuijpers, W., J. Biomed. Mater. Res., 20, 1986, 11971217.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Bruijn, J.D. de, Klein, C.P.A.T., Terpstra, R.A., Groot, K. de and Blitterswijk, C.A. van, in Interfaces in Medicine & Mechanics 2, edited by Williams, K.R. et al. (Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1991) pp. 420429.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Maniatopoulos, C., Sodek, J. and Melcher, A.H., Cell Tissue Res., 254, 1988, 317330.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Groot, C.G., Acid groups in the organic matrix of foetal bone. An electron microscopical study, PhD Thesis Leiden, The Netherlands, 1982.Google Scholar
11. Davies, J.E., Lowenberg, B., Shiga, A., J. Biomed. Mater. Res., 1990, 1289–1306.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Lowenberg, B., Chernecky, R., Shiga, A. and Davies, J.E., Cells & Materials, 1(3), 1991, 177187.Google Scholar
13. de Bruijn, J.D., Klein, C.P.A.T., de Groot, K. and van Blitterswijk, C.A., The ultrastructure of the bone-hydroxyapatite interface in vitro, (Subm. J. Biomed. Mater. Res.).Google Scholar
14. Davies, J.E., Chernecky, R., Lowenberg, B., Shiga, A., Cells & Materials 1(1), 1991, 315.Google Scholar
15. Davies, J.E., Ottensmyer, P., Shen, X., Hashimoto, M., Peel, S.A.F., in: The Bone Biomaterial Interface edited by Davies, J.E. (University of Toronto Press, Toronto, 1991) 214228.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16. Pilliar, R.M., Davies, J.E. and Smith, D.C., MRS-bulletin, sept. 1991, 55–61.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17. Davies, J.E., Nagai, N., Takeshita, N. and Smith, D.C., in: The Bone Biomaterial Interface edited by Davies, J.E. (University of Toronto Press, Toronto, 1991) 285294.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
18. Johnsson, M.S.A., Paschalis, E. and Nancollas, G.H., in: The Bone Biomaterial Interface edited by Davies, J.E. (University of Toronto Press, Toronto, 1991), 6875.Google Scholar
19. Veerman, E.C.I., Suppers, R.J.F., Klein, C.P.A.T., Groot, K. de and Amerongen, A.V. Nieuw, in Implant and Materials in Biofunction edited by Putter, C. de, Lange, G.L. de, Groot, K. de and Lee, A.J.C., (Elsevier Science Publishers, Amsterdam, 1988) pp. 337342.Google Scholar
20. Sautier, J.M., Nefussi, J.R. and Forest, N., Cells & Materials 1(3), 1991, 209217.Google Scholar
21. Scherft, J.P., J. Ultrastruct. Res., 23, 1968, 333343.Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Ultrastructure of the Mineralized Tissue/Calcium Phosphate Interface in Vitro
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Ultrastructure of the Mineralized Tissue/Calcium Phosphate Interface in Vitro
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Ultrastructure of the Mineralized Tissue/Calcium Phosphate Interface in Vitro
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *