Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-75dct Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-05-30T14:21:27.426Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Towards Alpha Radiation Detection in Aqueous Solution: VLSI Technology Development for Diamond-Silicon Hybrid Sensors

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 October 2015

C. Giese
Affiliation:
Fraunhofer Institute for applied solid states physics, Tullastrasse 72, 79115 Freiburg, Germany
G. Lewes-Malandrakis
Affiliation:
Fraunhofer Institute for applied solid states physics, Tullastrasse 72, 79115 Freiburg, Germany
J. de Sanoit
Affiliation:
CEA-LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France
M. Pomorski
Affiliation:
CEA-LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France
C. Nebel
Affiliation:
Fraunhofer Institute for applied solid states physics, Tullastrasse 72, 79115 Freiburg, Germany
Get access

Abstract

In the presented work, we have developed VLSI technology processes for new prototype sensors based on the synthesis of boron doped nanocrystalline diamond (B-NCD) and silicon based commercial detectors. The process is based on commercial passivated implanted planar silicon (PIPS) devices of PD450 and CAM450 types (CANBERRA). A layer of B-NCD of several hundred nanometers thickness and boron concentration up to 1021 atoms/cm3 is grown on the SiOx passivation layer in an ellipsoidal plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) reactor at temperatures from 520-750°C, in hydrogen atmosphere. . The diamond electrode is dry chemically structured and aluminum electrodes are realized before mounting in a three-fold housing for measurements in aqueous solution. The prototype sensors show an alpha spectroscopy resolution of 100 keV for 241Am electroprecipitated from liquid solution.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2015 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

REFERENCES

Lizon, C., Fritsch, P., Int. J. Radiat: Biol. 75 (11), 14591471 (1999)Google Scholar
Holm, E., Fukai, R., Talanta 24 (11), 659664 (1977)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bickel, M., Holmes, L., Janzon, C., Koulouris, G., Pilvio, R., Slowikowski, B., Hill, C., Appl. Radiat. Isot. 53, 511 (2000)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Salar Amoli, H., Barker, J., Indian, J. Chem. 46A, 16181620 (2007)Google Scholar
Balmer, R.S. et al. , J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 21, 364221 (2009)Google Scholar
de Sanoit, J, Tran, T.Q., Pomorski, M., Pierre, S., Mer-Calfati, Ch., Bergonzo, Ph.., Design of an electrochemically assisted radiation sensor for α-spectrometry of actinides traces in water. Applied Radiation and Isotopes. Vol 80, (2013) 3241P.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Füner, M., Wild, C., Koidl, P., Novel microwave plasma reactor for diamond synthesis, Appl. Phys. Lett., 1998, 72, 11491151 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vitorge: Chimie des actinides, Techniques de l’ingénieur, BN 3520–2, (1999) Google Scholar
Tran, Q.T., Pomorski, M., de Sanoit, J., Mer-Calfati, C., Bergonzo, P.., Optimization of the efficiency of diamond based alpha-particles sensors for spectrometry of actinide trace in aqueous solutions. I.E.E.E., Transactions on Nuclear Science, (2013). Third International Conference on Advancements in Nuclear Instrumentation Measurement Methods and Their applications (ANIMMA) 2327 june 2013, Marseille, FranceGoogle Scholar